Blade Runner

(Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?)

Dick, Philip K.

Book - 2007
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Blade Runner
Print
Random House, Inc.
It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.
Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignmet--find them and then..."retire" them. Trouble was, the androids all looked exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!

Baker & Taylor
Captures the strange world of twenty-first-century Earth, a devastated planet in which sophisticated androids, banned from the planet, fight back against their potential destroyers

Baker
& Taylor

Captures the strange world of twenty-first-century Earth, a devastated planet in which sophisticated androids, banned from the planet, fight back against their potential destroyers, while bounty hunter Rick Deckard sets out to track down the replicants. Reissue. (Tie-in to the Fall 2007 release of the deluxe twenty-fifth anniversary DVD of the Warner Bros. film, directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, and others) (Science Fiction)

Publisher: New York : Del Rey, 2007, c1968
Edition: Del Rey mass market ed
ISBN: 0345350472
9780345350473
Branch Call Number: SCI-FI D
Characteristics: 265 p. ; 18 cm.

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Mar 13, 2015
  • jamilad rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I was a little hesitant to read the book looking at the reviews, but I actually quite enjoyed it. Takes a little to get into, but then it pulls you in and it's hard to put it down until it ends. Short, quick read, so if you like sci-fi, why not?

Sep 03, 2014
  • joliebergman rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

I struggle with most Science Fiction. And by struggle I mean my eyes begin to glaze over at first sight of the super sci-fi technology minutiae. I actually had the same problem with Dune… which makes me sad because I really want to enjoy reading (rather than watching – which I enjoy!) more classic science fiction. Read the first quarter, skipped every handful of pages or so, then read the last three pages. Satisfied.

Jul 24, 2014
  • mbssmith rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book was okay. I personally thought the movie was better. Rachael was much better in the movie. The one part in the book that made more sense in the book than in the movie was the part where Deckard meets Rachael for the first time.

Apr 30, 2014

Like peering into another world and getting to eavesdrop on a more important conversation. This book definitely makes life a little more livable by showing how everyday habits can easily become fantasy through one's own perspective.

Oct 02, 2013

Well worth the read. I won't go so far as to praise the book with shock and awe, but it kept me. It's about life really, and how a single day can go from confused, to wonderful, and finally to utterly exhausting. How, when our notions of reality are put to the test, new notions may be brought to life. And how these new notions, these moments of clarity or enlightenment can fundamentally alter how we interact with the world. The science fiction is necessary, to a degree, but to me it is more of an aesthetic in this story. A neat way to illustrate decay, and hardship. Some say Dick's world is far off, but I don't entirely agree. The urban has taken much life from the city dweller, but not yet too much, though some feel it more than others. When will we must dream of electric sheep, because everyone is too poor to own a real one?

Aug 30, 2013
  • flufficorn rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A truly amazing book, well worth the time. A human rights story, and a story of self-realization and self-defeat. It could be a grim glimpse into the future of the environment and society as we know it, assuming space travel ever becomes a reality. When I read the end of the book, I was disappointed. But upon reflection and realizing just how normally it ends, I am greatly satisfied with it. Deckard is a human, with human flaws, but then again what is human?

Jun 19, 2013
  • Quetzlzacatenango rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Once your familiar with Philip K. Dick you know you're going to be in for a story filled with strange details like Buster Friendly, lead codpieces, empathy boxes, and obsessions with having a live animal. But like most of his stories the core idea is so solid and engaging when you're done you realize the strange details are the author's humor, satire, and unique metaphors.

Jan 31, 2013
  • DanMenard rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Definitely a sci-fi classic, but not all it's hyped up to be. The exploration of emotion/empathy as a largely defining characteristic of humans is an interesting one within the context of a world wherein androids are otherwise indistinguishable from humans.

However, even as a short book, it seemed like it could have been more effectively conveyed through a novella or short story. I don't think that it dragged on, but there was too much filler.

I wouldn't recommend against reading it, but if you're looking for a great story instead of filling in gaps in your sci-fi repertoire, move on.

Dec 17, 2012
  • LazyNeko rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

More different from the Bladerunner movie than I expected. It thoughtfully explores the uniquely human quality of empathy, which turns out to be more like a curse in Deckard's bleak world.

Sep 11, 2012
  • Jean-Pierre Lebel rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

In volume two of DADOES the character of Rick Deckard, I have come to realize, really begins to take shape. More depth than Harrison Ford's portrayal in Blade Runner. We can see just how resourceful he is and why it makes sense that he'd become a bounty hunter. What really grabs me is his obsession with owning a true animal rather than an artificially manufactured one. He owns an electric sheep, but is ashamed that it isn't a true flesh and blood creature. This is his motivation for hunting down the escaped Nexus-6 replicants. There are plenty of details to be found in the original narrative that didn't make it into the movie. This series is recommended to fans of Blade Runner.

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Oct 28, 2014

“Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday's homeopape. When nobody's around, kipple reproduces itself. For instance, if you go to bed leaving any kipple around your apartment, when you wake up the next morning there's twice as much of it. It always gets more and more."

Oct 28, 2014
  • PimaLib_JB rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday's homeopape. When nobody's around, kipple reproduces itself. For instance, if you go to bed leaving any kipple around your apartment, when you wake up the next morning there's twice as much of it. It always gets more and more."

Dec 17, 2012
  • LazyNeko rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

He thought, too, about his need for a real animal; within him an actual hatred once more manifested itself toward his electric sheep, which he had to tend, had to care about, as if it lived. The tyranny of an object, he thought. It doesn't know I exist. Like the androids, it had no ability to appreciate the existence of another.

Aug 12, 2009
  • Wolvie rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity. At some time, every creature which lives must do so. It is the ultimate shadow, the defeat of creation; this is the curse at work, the curse that feeds on all life. Everywhere in the universe.

May 10, 2009
  • DavidB rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I'm seeing one of them for the the first time. And they damn near did it; they came awfully damn close to undermining the Voigt-Kampff scale, the only method we have for detecting them. The Rosen Association does a good job -- makes a good try, anyhow -- at protecting its products. And I have to face six more of them, he reflected. Before I'm finished. He would earn the bounty money. Every cent. Assuming he made it through alive.

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Oct 29, 2013

sannuus thinks this title is suitable for 8 years and over

Jul 21, 2012
  • everydayathena rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

everydayathena thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Jun 10, 2008
  • jabey rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

jabey thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Summary

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Oct 02, 2013

Do Androids dream of electric sheep? Do androids dream at all? Do they hope for something better? Humans have dreams and hopes, and humans have empathy. How and why have these traits come about? Research on this can be found, yet here, Dick has explored what happens when these traits are missing. How cold logic and curiosity can take over, and how when the pain in others does not register, or the pleasure for that matter, lead ultimately to worse and deadly choices. Can a person live without these qualities? Would they be condemned by their peers? What happens when we remove the spider's legs? Does it make a difference if the spider is artificial? I personally was intrigued when a discussion about judgment came up, or at least it did in my mind. A being exists which is pure acceptance, and lacking in judgment. Lacking judgment allows for a more clear perception of the worald, and a release from stress. What happens when this point is reached, and can it be reversed? Can a mind go from complete numbing acceptance to the strong opinion and emotional reactiveness which seems more common to human nature. If you, or anyone, lacked empathy, how would you go about testing for its existence in others? At some point, though we may recognize the pain of another, most people have committed some act at the painful expense of someone else. So, then, does empathy only give recognition of feeling? Are some more susceptible to their empathic sense than others? I would imagine so; in fact, I'm sure I've observed this. If your arrival to this work was due to watching the film Blade Runner do not expect too much similarity. Certainly, many of the characters and ideas, and even at times the plot, seem to go with the film, but ultimately it is quite a different experience. The landscape of Dick's future is hard and polluted. So much so that it can take lives, and souls. Try not to let the imagery of the film be the backdrop when you read, for it is not quite the same. And, in order to prolong the inevitable build-up of kipple, I suggest checking this book out from the library so that you can return it before it breaks down... Then again, I would consider one worth keeping in the personal collection.

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May 10, 2009
  • DavidB rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: "Copulation with an android; absolutely against the law, here and on the colony worlds as well."

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