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Steve Jobs

Isaacson, Walter (eBook - 2011 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
Steve Jobs


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"FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING BIOGRAPHIES OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AND ALBERT EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE EXCLUSIVE BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS. Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years--as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues--Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing. At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. Although Jobs cooperated with this book, he asked for no control over what was written nor even the right to read it before it was published. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted. Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple's hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values"--
Authors: Isaacson, Walter
Statement of Responsibility: Walter Isaacson
Title: Steve Jobs
[electronic resource]
Publisher: New York :, Simon & Schuster,, c2011
Characteristics: 1 online resource
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Report This Sep 30, 2013
  • Gregorywall rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson I was really enthralled by this book. This volume was a lengthy and worthy life summary of a man that had a great influence in our world. He was recorded as repeatedly stating that his goal was to "change the universe", and he seems to have done so in many ways. He has changed the way we use computers with contributions to the graphical interface, he largely influenced the way we have access to digital media and apps with iTunes/iTunes U/App Store, and created baseline standards for what we expect from portable devices such as portable media players, phones, and tablets. Steve Jobs had reportedly encouraged the author to go on his own and honestly report what he found from his research and interviews without the totalitarian oversight that he would have probably exerted if he was more involved in the selection of content. Positive and negative aspects of Steve's personality, experiences, and decisions appear to be extremely accurate and diverse. Although he seemed to be largely influenced by spiritual teachings of Zen Buddihsm, meditation, and eastern philosophy, he did not seem to develop the inner peace and calm that is usually expected from those influences when handling others' feelings and positions. He reportedly held that things (ideas, products, efforts, people) were either great or horrible, rarely taking a middle ground. However, the quirks of his overbearing personality and intuition are what seemed to have given him the invaluable ability to motivate and drive himself and his associates to achieve so much. This book is a great read that will likely suck you into his "reality distortion field" and amaze, inspire, mortify, and astonish most readers.

please send copy to Millard Branch for pickup

Report This May 20, 2013
  • JCLRachelSH rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

My takeaways from the initial buzz about Steve Jobs were: 1) He was kind of jerk, and 2) He ate a lot of weird orange food. 650 pages later, I agree that Jobs would’ve been a tough guy to work for, yet I admire his determination to bring his visions to life without sparing any egos. Isaacson entertained me with dishy stories about Jobs’ early hippie ethos -- his obsession with meditation, veganism, LSD and Bob Dylan sparked a lifelong tension between fighting versus becoming Big Brother. But the big shiny jewel of the biography is its treatment of closed versus open systems. While I’m fundamentally an open systems kinda girl, Steve Jobs’ infamous “reality distortion field” finally has me persuaded that closed systems win the prize for most poetic user experience.

Report This Apr 29, 2013
  • Hazeldeantag rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

An innovative and creative biography, just like the man it's about. The reality behind a multibillionaire, a great read. Recommended for adults.

Very much enjoyed this book. There are many brilliant people who changed the world who weren't assholes so in that regards Steve Jobs disappoints. This also contradicts the importance for emotional intelligence:)

Report This Mar 07, 2013
  • AyChihuahua rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

An excellent read! First, I really liked learning about the skills that Jobs leveraged to build a multibillion dollar company from basically nothing. From what I gathered, Jobs' main role early on was coming up with a vision for Apple's various products and then recruiting exactly the right people to implement each feature. For example, when making the Apple II, Jobs decided that it shouldn't have a fan because it would be too noisy for consumers. Instead, he talked an engineer that he met at the Homebrew Computer Club into working for him, because the engineer had figured out how to design an oscillating power source that would allow the computer to run at a much lower temperature. Every computer since then has depended on this innovation. Second, it was interesting to learn more about Jobs' character. Before reading this book, I had already read elsewhere about how Jobs was simultaneously a charismatic visionary and an insufferable egomaniac. What I didn't know what that he was extremely prone to tears, in addition to his crazy temper tantrums. Anyone who is interested in learning about how someone who was such a jerk managed to lead such a great company will find this a very good read indeed!

Report This Jan 30, 2013
  • ewakk rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Excellent book, excellent story. I am in awe.

Report This Dec 17, 2012
  • Gary Geiserman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Lot o’ ground covered, much more to cover. Isaacson chosen to document for straight record. He gathered a lot of testimony and put it together very well, as Steve figured he would. No technology here. No apprehension of the vision Steve apprehended and shepherded to the physical plane. A good feeling of the personality. A lot of anecdotes that are revealing. Not the real story, however. Steve chose an extreme personality perfectly placed in circumstance to zap all the ingredients, and to do it as a visionary, one who grasps and holds the big picture and presents it to fruition. A Shaman, medicine man, black curtain man, artist. Various names in various places. The ip revolution is part of the same dream of ‘60s all the rest is from: a spiritual revolution, still happening now. John Markoff’s What The Dormouse Said, mentioned by Isaacson, fills in the missing link and lets us know what a miricle computers/internet is. Steve was the Magic Carpet that flew us here. Steve, with Syrian bazaar trader skills combined with short medium and long range vision of what is happening/will happen, allowed him to pull, as he described, aikido moves on his opponent. Time after time he used martial art skills to perfection to shanghai old school types. He old-old-schooled them. He got the ‘Dragon’ to ‘eat it’s own tail’ (example: ‘plasma bottles’ used in flying saucers, ours and theirs. Use the resonant frequency of an element’s metal to hold it in place w/o extreme temp/pressure. You thus have one thing acting as two.). For some more examples read the Steve Jobs chapter of Steve Knopper’s, Appetite For Self-Destruction. Some new metaphysics now: Steve was the end of the end. This is marvelous. He was in touch with all the ‘over-tones’ of the set of the status quo and, of course, the over-tones of the beginning of the new, which we are creating post Mayan calendar-style right now. Microsoft (now Google) was the Old, Steve finished them off. Being the true end of a set is also to be in touch with the pre-beginnings and over-tones of our new ‘Great Work’. Jobs brought us to the end of Phase One of the computer/internet Miracle, portable wireless computers, iPhone and iPad. Implants too. Isaacson tries to make sense of Job’s ‘Mission Impossible’ by citing union of hardware/software et al and various of Steve’s espoused Eastern Philosophic understandings. But really, Steve rode the Vision (he was in love throughout) and brought about what ever ‘next step’ was needed. Seeing and understanding this Vision/Dream explains all. Clarity and Excellence, ‘Tree of Life’ qualities. So it’s not really about cloning hardware or licensing software; just what ever is needed at the time. You love it and appreciate it’s Truth and Beauty. And you know.

Report This Dec 17, 2012
  • ywchung229 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

a very good read on the evolution of Steve Jobs from the boy who started a garage-company into the leader who rebuilt a broken company to change the world as we know it today. A very good read, definitely.

Report This Oct 26, 2012
  • SpyderGT rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Although I am not a member of the cult of Apple, I found this biography enlightening of Jobs and the corporate empire he created.

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Report This Dec 17, 2012
  • Gary Geiserman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

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Report This Jun 27, 2012
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Report This Jun 11, 2012
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jwang91770 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 45

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Report This Dec 05, 2011
  • Bazooka_B9 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

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Report This Oct 24, 2011
  • Blue_Beaver_11 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

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Report This Jan 11, 2012
  • skcool rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Isaacson received the exclusive chance of interviewing Jobs and the dozens of people closest to him. But at the end of the 600-some pages, offers up little analysis or depth into the real Steve Jobs. What made him tick? What gave him the razor sharp business acumen to predict consumer trends? Why WAS he so mean and pathological? Isaacson dances around main issues plenty of times and certainly offers some juicy anecdotal tales and guesses from friends and colleagues, but in the end, he himself never forms a composite answer. This biography reads like an never-ending interview as the interviewer moves from one quote to another and one source to another. That may have been fine as an interview piece for TIME (for which he used to write) but it's hardly enough for a lasting memoir. What upsets me the most is the fact that Jobs allowed Isaacson this rare chance into his personal circle so that he can understand Jobs like nobody can ever before. All this in order for Isaacson to write a biography that JOBS' CHILDREN CAN READ AND GET TO KNOW THEIR FATHER. Jobs himself admits that he's hardly the model father, more often than not neglecting their care for his companies, Pixar and Apple. This biography was suppose to be a chance for Jobs to show his children why he did the things he did and share his passion for his work. But Isaacson understands neither business nor Apple enough to fully capture this. Although the second half of the book is mostly about the growth of Apple in the last decade - relegating Jobs, the person, to a minute role in the book - Isaacson lacks the business capacity to fully analyze the full cause and effects of Apple's decisions, products and actions. So what you are left with is a hap hash mix of personal anecdotes on Jobs and rough dissections on Apple - not enough biography nor enough business case study. Even worse, what Isaacson wrote on the personality of Jobs is NOT a flattering one in the least. Even the most ardent Jobs/Apple fanatic will find it hard to like him after the picture Isaacson paints in his book. If the average reader is left wanting after reading this, I can only wonder what his children will think when they have a chance to read it.

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Report This Dec 05, 2011
  • Bazooka_B9 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: A couple of "F-ers" here and there, but nothing to be to concerned about and they're never used in a sexual context.

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Good Artists copy, Great artists steal !!!

Report This Jun 04, 2012
  • swissmiss711 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Stay hungry. Stay foolish.

Report This Jan 11, 2012
  • skcool rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

HI READ THIS BOOK NOW

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