Dear Library Patrons, The mission of NYPL is to inspire lifelong learning, advance knowledge, and strengthen our communities. Government support only pays for a portion of our work, so we rely on you to help - from stocking our shelves with amazing books, expanding our e-Book selection, classes, events, or even making free WiFi accessible to all. We are trying to raise $500,000 by December 31: an ambitious goal, but one that will fund incredible learning and reading in our community. Please consider donating to help keep our services free to all New Yorkers in 2015 >>

[]
[]

Project 65

Mississippi Summer

(Spoken-word CD - 1965)
Project 65
Print
The second part of the documentary begins with a focus on cultural differences between white Mississippi residents and visiting activists, with comments from the mayor of McComb, Miss. A segment explores the boycott of white-owned stores in Greenwood, Miss., sponsored by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). The educational system in Mississippi, and the creation of Freedom Schools, is discussed, with recordings of a class in a Freedom School conducting a lesson on the Birmingham riots. The remainder of the program focuses on issues surrounding the registration of black voters and the efforts of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Hartman Turnbow describes his attempt to register to vote, and the subsequent firebombing of his home. A teenage volunteer from out of state, Joe Harris, is recorded canvasing for the MFDP. Two-part radio documentary about the experiences of the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project of 1964, including interviews with civil rights activists and Mississippi residents on both sides of the debate about civil rights, segregation and voter registration. Part one begins with a discussion of the murder of three civil rights activists, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner and James Chaney, near Philadelphia, Miss., and includes an interview with Schwerner's widow, Rita, an excerpt from a speech given at Chaney's memorial service, and interviews with local residents. The social conditions of Mississippi are explored through interviews with residents, who discuss the nature of racism in the South; the purpose of the White Citizens Councils; the use of derogatory racial language; the insularity of Mississippi and resentment of outsiders seen as "agitators," and the economy of plantations and tenant farmers, described by farmer Hartman Turnbow. In a section on violence in the civil rights conflict, Fannie Lou Hamer describes being beaten in a jail in Winona, Miss., and a volunteer from Wisconsin describes being beaten in a medical clinic. Conditions in the black community of Harmony, where some out-of-state activists stayed, are discussed.

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Find it at NYPL

  Loading...

Your Cart

Hello! We noticed you have the following items in your cart right now:

If you'd still like to purchase the items you have in your cart, you can do that now.

You'll be able to purchase your eBook after you have checked out your current cart.

Project 65
Project 65

To continue with your eBook purchase immediately, you can clear your cart by clicking below.

All items will be removed from your cart.


I'd like to keep browsing! I'll decide later.

Powered by BiblioCommons.
app16 Version Hasselnot Last updated 2014/12/18 17:24