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Jacqueline Kennedy

Historic Conversations on Life With John F. Kennedy, Interviews With Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., 1964
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994 (Book - 2011 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Jacqueline Kennedy
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Shortly after President John F. Kennedy's assassination, with a nation deep in mourning and the world looking on in stunned disbelief, Jacqueline Kennedy found the strength to set aside her own personal grief for the sake of posterity and begin the task of documenting and preserving her husband's legacy. In January of 1964, she and Robert F. Kennedy approved a planned oral-history project that would capture their first-hand accounts of the late President as well as the recollections of those closest to him throughout his extraordinary political career. For the rest of her life, the famously private Jacqueline Kennedy steadfastly refused to discuss her memories of those years, but beginning that March, she fulfilled her obligation to future generations of Americans by sitting down with historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and recording an astonishingly detailed and unvarnished account of her experiences and impressions as the wife and confidante of John F. Kennedy. The tapes of those sessions were then sealed and later deposited in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum upon its completion, in accordance with Mrs. Kennedy's wishes.
Authors: Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994
Statement of Responsibility: foreword by Caroline Kennedy ; introduction and annotations by Michael Beschloss
Title: Jacqueline Kennedy
historic conversations on life with John F. Kennedy, interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., 1964
Publisher: New York : Hyperion, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: xxxii, 368 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. + 8 sound discs (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents: The first conversation : John F. Kennedy's presidential aspirations ; 1956 vice-presidential nomination ; Fight for control of Massachusetts delegation ; 1953-54 Boston politics ; Early married life ; 1954 surgery ; JFK's temperament ; Georgetown social life ; White House parties ; JFK's impact on others ; Adlai Stevenson ; 1958 Massachusetts Senate campaign
The second conversation : JFK's reading habits ; JFK's childhood interests and heroes ; JFK's opinions of Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt ; Joseph P. Kennedy ; JFK's temperament ; Charles de Gaulle ; 1960 rivals ; 1960 campaign ; Profiles in Courage authorship ; JFK-Robert F. Kennedy relationship ; JFK's political courage ; 1960 campaign ; Wisconsin and West Virginia primaries
The third conversation : JFK and Joseph McCarthy ; 1960 primary election nights ; Summer 1960, Hyannis Port ; Democratic National Convention ; Lyndon Johnson as running mate ; Political adversaries ; JFK's health ; Presidential debates ; Election Day 1960 ; JFK's religious beliefs ; Relations with Catholic clergy
The fourth conversation : Transition to the presidency ; Birth of John F. Kennedy, Jr. ; Choosing the cabinet ; Life in the White House ; JFK's plans for life after the presidency ; JFK-RFK-Edward M. Kennedy relationship ; Early days in the White House ; White House restoration and guidebook ; JFK-Jacqueline Kennedy relationship ; Inaugural address ; Inauguration day and inaugural balls ; Social life in the White House ; JFK's daily routine ; JFK's back problems ; JBK's staff and friends
The fifth conversation : The Cuban Revolution ; The Bay of Pigs ; Latin America ; Heads of state and state visits ; Harold Macmillan ; Visit to Canada ; Visit to France ; Charles de Gaulle ; André Malraux and the Mona Lisa
The sixth conversation : U.S.-German relations ; Berlin crisis ; JFK's temperament ; Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi ; Nuclear disarmament ; Harold Macmillan ; Hickory Hill seminars-JFK on Lincoln ; Steel crisis ; J. Edgar Hoover ; Civil rights ; 1963 March on Washington ; Martin Luther King, Jr. ; The Cuban Missile Crisis ; Lyndon Johnson ; Mike Mansfield ; Other staff and friends
The seventh conversation : Harold Macmillan and Skybolt ; Charles de Gaulle and the Common Market ; JBK's trip to India ; JFK and State Department ; Vietnam ; Henry and Clare Boothe Luce ; Latin America ; JFK and Dean Rusk, Chester Bowles, Averell Harriman, Douglas Dillon ; Supreme Court appointments ; New York Times v. Sullivan ; JBK on her "image" ; JFK's relationships with staff ; JFK and children ; JFK's plans for second term ; 1964 campaign
Summary: Shortly after President John F. Kennedy's assassination, with a nation deep in mourning and the world looking on in stunned disbelief, Jacqueline Kennedy found the strength to set aside her own personal grief for the sake of posterity and begin the task of documenting and preserving her husband's legacy. In January of 1964, she and Robert F. Kennedy approved a planned oral-history project that would capture their first-hand accounts of the late President as well as the recollections of those closest to him throughout his extraordinary political career. For the rest of her life, the famously private Jacqueline Kennedy steadfastly refused to discuss her memories of those years, but beginning that March, she fulfilled her obligation to future generations of Americans by sitting down with historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and recording an astonishingly detailed and unvarnished account of her experiences and impressions as the wife and confidante of John F. Kennedy. The tapes of those sessions were then sealed and later deposited in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum upon its completion, in accordance with Mrs. Kennedy's wishes.
Subject Headings: Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963 Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994 Interviews Presidents United States Biography Presidents' spouses United States Interviews United States Politics and government 1961-1963
Topical Term: Presidents
Presidents' spouses
Additional Contributors: Schlesinger, Arthur M. - 1917-2007 - (Arthur Meier),
Beschloss, Michael R.
Kennedy, Caroline - 1957-
Publisher No: UA5935(8)
ISBN: 9781401324254
1401324258
Branch Call Number: 973.922 O
Research Call Number: IBM 12-645 [Text]
*BLF-2025 [CD]
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Dec 04, 2012
  • hmcgivney rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is such a valuable recording! It was several informal conversations that Jackie Kennedy had with historian Arthur Schlesinger about JFK. They took place in her living room, about four months after the assassination, and one can hear them smoking and the ice clinking in their glasses. Most of the conversations were about JFK's political career, and some parts were more interesting than others (I don't really care about diplomatic relations with France, but I loved hearing about the Cuban Missile Crisis and how Jackie refused to leave, saying that if they were all going to die, she wanted to do it as a family). The most interesting things were Jackie's ideas about what a wife should be, her restoration of the White House, and the personal details about Jack (ex. he was an Anglophile who could read a book a day and loved historical objects).

Jun 27, 2012
  • HopeButterfly rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Good book. Was surprised at Mrs. Kennedy's negativity towards some powerful people. Surprised is an understatement.

I checked this out for the cd's of Jackie.They were not included either.

I always knew that Jackie Onassis was an elitist snob who was mad that people copied her style, and listening to this just cinched it for me. She doesn't like anybody, it seems, and supposedly, Jack did. The way I see it, Jackie Onassis is one of those women who absolutely hated their husbands when they were alive, and then when they died suddenly, they became a SAINT and everything they said or did suddenly becomes golden and sanctified. That is my opinion of how she tried to create the Camelot myth. Nice to hear it, though, if you want to believe the fairytale she perpetuated, and now for my one good thing to say. I love her voice. I wish I had a 'babykins' voice, I have always loved her voice.

Dec 02, 2011
  • MadReads rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

I thought the interviews would give me an inside glimpse at one of America's most well-known presidents and the Kennedy family. However, in reality, most of the conversations centered around Jackie's mostly negative opinions of, well, everybody. She does not mince words. From Mrs. Nixon (bitter and rude) to Martin Luther King (she says he held orgies), people in Wisconsin (suspicious & “Eww!”) Jackie does not approve. I always assumed Jackie was someone to be admired but a lot of what she said rubbed me the wrong way. She believed that a woman should be submissive in her marriage, so much so that at one point she relays a story in which someone asked her where her views came from and she replied, "all of my opinions come from my husband." She truly believed that her place was to create a relaxing environment for Jack and so therefore she wasn't really involved much in politics. Schlesinger has to remind her of important dates and details, and her common refrain is "Wasn't it?" "Didn't he?" She comes across as a spectator in her own life. Jackie also viewed Jack’s religious beliefs to be a "superstition.” She thought that his evening prayers were "a little childish mannerism", and she found them amusing. Maybe Jack wasn't all that religious- I don't know, but I don't know that Jackie knew either. She doesn't come across and being very knowledgeable even when it comes to Jack, instead she seems rather catty and her breathy, Marilyn Monroe type voice, doesn't help.

Dec 02, 2011
  • BigMoose rated this: 1 stars out of 5.

Most common answer from Mrs. Kennedy: "Oh, I don't know." Boring.

Nov 10, 2011
  • fairboy rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

I'm rather disappointed.

If you saw the ABC special about the tapes you saw the most interesting parts of this book. There were extremely dry passages about the campaign trail and JFK's cabinet.

I was rather surprised that the CD's of the actual tapes were not included with the check out though they were plainly shown in the picture accompanying the listing.

Oct 27, 2011
  • TERRI Z HISEL rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Though her daughter, Caroline, presents a lovely introduction, the memoir itself is superficial and often confusing jumble of snippets-and snipes. Fairly, as also noted by Ms Kennedy-Schlossberg, Mrs Kennedy was likely still grief stricken when she allowed the sessions. The obsequious Mr. Schlessenger, the interviewer, did her no favors in allowing the interviews to ramble. Not the best read of the Camelot couple.

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app03 Version sidamo (sidamo) Last updated 2014/09/17 15:16