[]
[]

Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club

Popular Music and the Avant-garde
Gendron, Bernard (Book - 2002)
Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club
Print

Item Details

Chicago Distribution Center
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, popular music was considered nothing but vulgar entertainment. Today, jazz and rock music are seen as forms of art, and their practitioners are regularly accorded a status on par with the cultural and political elite. To take just one recent example, Bono, lead singer and lyricist of the rock band U2, got equal and sometimes higher billing than Pope John Paul II on their shared efforts in the Jubilee 2000 debt-relief project.

When and how did popular music earn so much cultural capital? To find out, Bernard Gendron investigates five key historical moments when popular music and avant-garde art transgressed the rigid boundaries separating high and low culture to form friendly alliances. He begins at the end of the nineteenth century in Paris's Montmartre district, where cabarets showcased popular music alongside poetry readings in spaces decorated with modernist art works. Two decades later, Parisian poets and musicians "slumming" in jazz clubs assimilated jazz's aesthetics in their performances and compositions. In the bebop revolution in mid-1940s America, jazz returned the compliment by absorbing modernist devices and postures, in effect transforming itself into an avant-garde art form. Mid-1960s rock music, under the leadership of the Beatles, went from being reviled as vulgar music to being acclaimed as a cutting-edge art form. Finally, Gendron takes us to the Mudd Club in the late 1970s, where New York punk and new wave rockers were setting the aesthetic agenda for a new generation of artists.

Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club should be on the shelves of anyone interested in the intersections between high and low culture, art and music, or history and aesthetics.


Univ of Chicago Div of the
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, popular music was considered nothing but vulgar entertainment. Today, jazz and rock music are seen as forms of art, and their practitioners are regularly accorded a status on par with the cultural and political elite. To take just one recent example, Bono, lead singer and lyricist of the rock band U2, got equal and sometimes higher billing than Pope John Paul II on their shared efforts in the Jubilee 2000 debt-relief project.

When and how did popular music earn so much cultural capital? To find out, Bernard Gendron investigates five key historical moments when popular music and avant-garde art transgressed the rigid boundaries separating high and low culture to form friendly alliances. He begins at the end of the nineteenth century in Paris's Montmartre district, where cabarets showcased popular music alongside poetry readings in spaces decorated with modernist art works. Two decades later, Parisian poets and musicians "slumming" in jazz clubs assimilated jazz's aesthetics in their performances and compositions. In the bebop revolution in mid-1940s America, jazz returned the compliment by absorbing modernist devices and postures, in effect transforming itself into an avant-garde art form. Mid-1960s rock music, under the leadership of the Beatles, went from being reviled as vulgar music to being acclaimed as a cutting-edge art form. Finally, Gendron takes us to the Mudd Club in the late 1970s, where New York punk and new wave rockers were setting the aesthetic agenda for a new generation of artists.

Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club should be on the shelves of anyone interested in the intersections between high and low culture, art and music, or history and aesthetics.



Authors: Gendron, Bernard
Statement of Responsibility: Bernard Gendron
Title: Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club
popular music and the avant-garde
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2002
Characteristics: x, 388 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 357-374) and index
Contents: Pop into art: French modernism. Section A. Cabaret artistry (1840-1920). The song of Montmartre ; The black cat goes to the Cabaret Voltaire. Section B. Paris in the jazz age (1916-25). Jamming at Le boeuf ; Negrophilia
Art into pop: American postmodernism. Section A. Jazz at war (1942-50). Moldy figs and modernists ; Bebop under fire. Section B. The cultural accreditation of the Beatles (1963-68). Gaining respect ; Accolades. Section C. New York: from new wave to no wave (1971-81) ; Punk before punk ; The first wave ; No wave ; At the Mudd Club
Subject Headings: Popular music History and criticism Avant-garde (Aesthetics)
Topical Term: Popular music
Avant-garde (Aesthetics)
LCCN: 2001042791
ISBN: 0226287351
0226287378
Branch Call Number: 784 G
MARC Display»

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Videos

Add a Video

There are no videos for this title yet.

Find it at NYPL

  Loading...

Buy It Now

Support your library, keep it forever!

View Purchase Options Learn more about this program

Your Cart

Hello! We noticed you have the following items in your cart right now:

If you'd still like to purchase the items you have in your cart, you can do that now.

You'll be able to purchase your eBook after you have checked out your current cart.

Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club
Gendron, Bernard
Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club

To continue with your eBook purchase immediately, you can clear your cart by clicking below.

All items will be removed from your cart.


I'd like to keep browsing! I'll decide later.

Explore Further


Browse the Shelf

Subject Headings


Recommendations

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.
app08 Version Arkelstorp Last updated 2014/10/23 09:41