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Predictably Irrational

The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions

Ariely, Dan

(Book - 2008)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Predictably Irrational
Print
Baker & Taylor
An evaluation of the sources of illogical decisions explores the reasons why irrational thought often overcomes level-headed practices, offering insight into the structural patterns that cause people to make the same mistakes repeatedly.

HARPERCOLL

  • Why do our headaches persist after taking a one-cent aspirin but disappear when we take a 50-cent aspirin?
  • Why does recalling the Ten Commandments reduce our tendency to lie, even when we couldn't possibly be caught?
  • Why do we splurge on a lavish meal but cut coupons to save twenty-five cents on a can of soup?
  • Why do we go back for second helpings at the unlimited buffet, even when our stomachs are already full?
  • And how did we ever start spending $4.15 on a cup of coffee when, just a few years ago, we used to pay less than a dollar?

When it comes to making decisions in our lives, we think we're in control. We think we're making smart, rational choices. But are we?

In a series of illuminating, often surprising experiments, MIT behavioral economist Dan Ariely refutes the common assumption that we behave in fundamentally rational ways. Blending everyday experience with groundbreaking research, Ariely explains how expectations, emotions, social norms, and other invisible, seemingly illogical forces skew our reasoning abilities.

Not only do we make astonishingly simple mistakes every day, but we make the same types of mistakes, Ariely discovers. We consistently overpay, underestimate, and procrastinate. We fail to understand the profound effects of our emotions on what we want, and we overvalue what we already own. Yet these misguided behaviors are neither random nor senseless. They're systematic and predictable?making us predictably irrational.

From drinking coffee to losing weight, from buying a car to choosing a romantic partner, Ariely explains how to break through these systematic patterns of thought to make better decisions. Predictably Irrational will change the way we interact with the world?one small decision at a time.



Book News
Ariely (behavioral economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) describes the effects of factors such as expectations, emotions, and social norms on human reasoning--such as how a more expensive medicine can seem more effective--and the resulting irrational decisions the mind makes. He explains how to break the pattern and therefore make better decisions. Each chapter is based on an experiment he conducted with colleagues, on topics such as supply and demand, the power of something that is free, the effect of sexual arousal, and procrastination. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

An upbeat cultural evaluation of the sources of illogical decisions explores the reasons why irrational thought often overcomes level-headed practices, offering insight into the structural patterns that cause people to make the same mistakes repeatedly. 150,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Harper, c2008
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780061353239
006135323X
Branch Call Number: 330.019 A
Characteristics: xxii, 280 p. ; 24 cm.

Opinion

From Library Staff

Comment by: BCD2013 May 06, 2014

Divided into easily digestible short chapters, the book follows many of Mr. Ariely's entertaining experiments and studies (many using students) to direct us to surprising conclusions about human nature. The Duke professor's personal anecdotes and pithy approach make this an enjoyable and very ins... Read More »


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Dec 11, 2014
  • francis_e rated this: 1 stars out of 5.

Enjoyable book to read but I found it followed on the coattails of Freakonomics too much without adding any intellectual depth. Most arguments, while cogent, were arrived at easily. Good book to read on a beech for vacation, but, would steer clear if you are trying to learn something new.

Sep 04, 2014
  • AngryCrow rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Good book. Each chapter rounds itself up nicely and has enough evidence to not only support the idea, but also give the reader enough knowledge to start to formulate questions of their own. Really elaborates on how people spend their money and a little on why.

Divided into easily digestible short chapters, the book follows many of Mr. Ariely's entertaining experiments and studies (many using students) to direct us to surprising conclusions about human nature. The Duke professor's personal anecdotes and pithy approach make this an enjoyable and very insightful non-fiction read that might have you sharing what you've learned with everyone you know.

May 06, 2014
  • Lavenderseas rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

not quite done with this one, but am enjoyoung the dicection of choices mn] socially very inerestin gto see ho---who is with who and whyl inforamtiond culd ve vusedin a cold heard=ted mannere or perhaps in a kinder mor informded routel I have done some self reflecin on and s]findk id interersinfdto eshamitlwhit wourldeand what failed as unrethe lendsi of the forcesand sqshuolouyo thatdruf=ve ysk

Jan 27, 2014
  • JackieFC13 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This was so interesting!! It's a series of studies that Dan Ariely conducted on human behavior and behavioral economics. It was fascinating! I would recommend it to anyone who has an interest in economics and the reason why people what they do. It is written for anyone and not difficult to understand as some economic books are. Happy Reading!

Mar 01, 2012
  • jcser rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A great book - both from a marketing/economical perspective and also from a social persepective. It points out fascinating simplicities about the human psyche with experiments that are well thought out and easy to understand. Well written and very well researched.

Mar 10, 2010
  • cllevett rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Excellent book. Funny how horribly simple creatures we really are. Thousands of years of philosophy and rational thought are so laughably forgotten when we are not mindful of our day,

Dec 21, 2008
  • 21288004246712 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

marketing suff

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